On December 22, British lawmakers will vote in favor of Prime Minister Johnson`s EU Withdrawal Act, which provides for a withdrawal date of January 31, 2020. Securing a majority in favour of passing the law in the House of Commons proved to be a big sticking point for the prime minister, but after a universal suffrage vote, Johnson`s Conservative Party took control of the House and the law passed by a majority of 124 votes. However, given that this may not be possible to negotiate before the end of the transition period, in December 2020 the EU insisted on a “backstop” regime to avoid a hard border until a free trade agreement enters into force. The dispute over what form this backstop should take prevented the withdrawal agreement from being sealed for so long. The receipt of the agreement in the House of Commons ranged from fresh to hostile and the vote was delayed by more than a month. Prime Minister May won a no-confidence motion against her own party, but the EU refused to accept further changes. Many people in Britain and on the continent are weeded with insecurity. Among them is Jon Worth, a political adviser who created (and recreated) flowcharts to represent the possible outcomes of the withdrawal process. On the EU side, the European Parliament also approved the ratification of the agreement on 29 January 2020[40] and the Council of the European Union approved the conclusion of the agreement by email on 30 January 2020[41]. [42] Accordingly, the European Union also deposited its instrument of ratification of the Agreement on 30 January 2020, thus concluding the Agreement[43] and brought it into force on the date of the Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union, on 31 January 2020, at 11 p.m GMT. Think of it as the separation agreement between Britain and the EU. With a length of 585 pages, it covers three main areas: after an unprecedented vote on 4 December 2018, MEPs decided that the UK government did not respect Parliament because it refused to give Parliament the full legal advice they had received on the impact of its proposed withdrawal conditions. [29] The central point of the opinion concerned the legal effect of the Backstop Agreement on Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom with regard to the customs border between the European Union and the United Kingdom and its impact on the Good Friday Agreement that led to the end of the unrest in Northern Ireland, and in particular on the security of the United Kingdom, to be able to leave the EU in practice, in accordance with the draft proposals.

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