Locke also referred to the government`s goal. For centuries, monarchies have asserted that their authority is born of God. But Locke claimed that people created the government. [4] People sacrifice a little freedom in exchange for the protection of their lives, freedom and property. Locke called this implicit agreement between a people and their government the social contract. If the government were to deprive people of their rights by abusing their authority, the treaty would be broken and the people were no longer bound by its terms. Epicurus in the fourth century BC Seemed to have had a strong sense of the social contract, with justice and law being rooted by mutual agreement and advantage, as evidenced, among other things, by its main doctrines (see also Epicurean ethics): most people understand the idea of natural or inalienable rights and think that no other person or government has the right to take their lives. Restrict their freedom or take their property without a very good reason. Quentin Skinner argued that several critical modern innovations in contract theory can be found in French Calvinist and Huguenot writings, the work of which was in turn called upon by writers in the Netherlands opposed to their submission to Spain, and then by Catholics in England. [11] Francisco Su├írez (1548-1617) of the Salamanca School could be considered an ancient theorist of the social contract who theorized natural law to limit the divine right of absolute monarchy. All these groups were led to express notions of popular sovereignty through a social alliance or treaty, and all these arguments began with proto-“natural state” arguments, so that the basis of politics is that everyone is naturally free from submission to any government. Rrousau`s strong sentence that man must be “forced to be free”[16] should be understood as follows: since indivisible and inalienable popular sovereignty decides what is good for the whole, then an individual, if he falls back into his ordinary selfishness and does not obey the law, will be obliged to listen to what was decided when the people acted as a collectivity (as a citizen). Thus, the law, to the extent that it is created by persons who act as a body, is not a restriction of individual freedom, but its expression.

The Constitution is the oldest and shortest written constitution in modern times, the culmination of American (British/European/Greek/etc.) political thought on the power of government. . . .