When an entity joins CTPAT, it is agreed to cooperate with CBP to protect the supply chain, identify security vulnerabilities and implement specific security measures and best practices. Applicants must address a wide range of security issues and present security profiles that list action plans for security direction throughout the supply chain. Mutual recognition (MR) relates to these activities, which involve the signing of a document between the foreign customs administration, enabling an exchange of information aimed at improving security of supply. The signed document (MR) indicates that the security requirements or standards of the foreign partnership program are similar, as well as its validation procedures. The essential concept of a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) is that CTPAT and the foreign program are compatible both in theory and in practice, so that one program recognizes the validation results of the other program. [2] When a company joins C-TPAT, it is agreed to cooperate with CBP to protect the supply chain, identify security vulnerabilities and implement specific security measures and best practices. As a general rule, there are three steps to C-TPAT certification: with this initiative, CBP invites companies to ensure the integrity of their security practices and to communicate and verify the security policies of their trading partners in the supply chain. Visit www.cbp.gov/CTPAT to receive instructions to complete annual exams and post training materials on routine CTPAT processes. Information about the new features is also published in the CTPAT Public Library.

The new updated minimum security criteria now available CTPAT partners enjoy a variety of benefits, including an active role in cooperating with the U.S. government in its war on terror. Partners are able to better identify their own security vulnerabilities and take corrective action to reduce risk. Some of the benefits of the program are: . Companies that obtain C-TPAT certification must have a documented procedure in place to identify and mitigate risks across their entire international supply chain. This allows companies to be considered low risk, resulting in an acceleration in the processing of their cargoes, including a reduced number of customs controls. [Citation required] When customs authorities provide tangible services to businesses that meet minimum safety standards and adhere to best practices, these companies are referred to as “trusted traders.” This concept is internationally recognized and is part of protocols such as the World Customs Organization`s SAFE standards framework.